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Publications by Eduardo D. Sontag in year 2003
Articles in journal or book chapters
  1. P. de Leenheer, D. Angeli, and E.D. Sontag. A feedback perspective for chemostat models with crowding effects. In Positive systems (Rome, 2003), volume 294 of Lecture Notes in Control and Inform. Sci., pages 167-174. Springer, Berlin, 2003. Keyword(s): systems biology, biochemical networks, nonlinear stability, dynamical systems, monotone systems.


  2. P. de Leenheer, D. Angeli, and E.D. Sontag. Small-gain theorems for predator-prey systems. In Positive systems (Rome, 2003), volume 294 of Lecture Notes in Control and Inform. Sci., pages 191-198. Springer, Berlin, 2003. Keyword(s): systems biology, biochemical networks, nonlinear stability, dynamical systems, monotone systems.


  3. D. Angeli and E.D. Sontag. Monotone control systems. IEEE Trans. Automat. Control, 48(10):1684-1698, 2003. Note: Errata are here: http://www.math.rutgers.edu/(tilde)sontag/FTPDIR/angeli-sontag-monotone-TAC03-typos.txt. [PDF] Keyword(s): systems biology, biochemical networks, nonlinear stability, dynamical systems, monotone systems.
    Abstract:
    Monotone systems constitute one of the most important classes of dynamical systems used in mathematical biology modeling. The objective of this paper is to extend the notion of monotonicity to systems with inputs and outputs, a necessary first step in trying to understand interconnections, especially including feedback loops, built up out of monotone components. Basic definitions and theorems are provided, as well as an application to the study of a model of one of the cell's most important subsystems.


  4. D. Angeli, E.D. Sontag, and Y. Wang. Input-to-state stability with respect to inputs and their derivatives. Internat. J. Robust Nonlinear Control, 13(11):1035-1056, 2003. [PDF] Keyword(s): input to state stability, input to state stability.
    Abstract:
    A new notion of input-to-state stability involving infinity norms of input derivatives up to a finite order k is introduced and characterized. An example shows that this notion of stability is indeed weaker than the usual ISS. Applications to the study of global asymptotic stability of cascaded nonlinear systems are discussed.


  5. M. Chyba, N. E. Leonard, and E.D. Sontag. Singular trajectories in multi-input time-optimal problems: Application to controlled mechanical systems. Journal of Dynamical and Control Systems, 9(1):103-129, 2003. [PDF] [doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1022159318457] Keyword(s): optimal control.
    Abstract:
    This paper addresses the time-optimal control problem for a class of control systems which includes controlled mechanical systems with possible dissipation terms. The Lie algebras associated with such mechanical systems enjoy certain special properties. These properties are explored and are used in conjunction with the Pontryagin maximum principle to determine the structure of singular extremals and, in particular, time-optimal trajectories. The theory is illustrated with an application to a time-optimal problem for a class of underwater vehicles.


  6. B.P. Ingalls, E.D. Sontag, and Y. Wang. An infinite-time relaxation theorem for differential inclusions. Proc. Amer. Math. Soc., 131(2):487-499, 2003. [PDF]
    Abstract:
    The fundamental relaxation result for Lipschitz differential inclusions is the Filippov-Wazewski Relaxation Theorem, which provides approximations of trajectories of a relaxed inclusion on finite intervals. A complementary result is presented, which provides approximations on infinite intervals, but does not guarantee that the approximation and the reference trajectory satisfy the same initial condition.


  7. L. Moreau and E.D. Sontag. Balancing at the border of instability. Phys. Rev. E (3), 68(2):020901, 4, 2003. [PDF] Keyword(s): bifurcations, adaptive control.
    Abstract:
    Some biological systems operate at the critical point between stability and instability and this requires a fine-tuning of parameters. We bring together two examples from the literature that illustrate this: neural integration in the nervous system and hair cell oscillations in the auditory system. In both examples the question arises as to how the required fine-tuning may be achieved and maintained in a robust and reliable way. We study this question using tools from nonlinear and adaptive control theory. We illustrate our approach on a simple model which captures some of the essential features of neural integration. As a result, we propose a large class of feedback adaptation rules that may be responsible for the experimentally observed robustness of neural integration. We mention extensions of our approach to the case of hair cell oscillations in the ear.


  8. L. Moreau, E.D. Sontag, and M. Arcak. Feedback tuning of bifurcations. Systems Control Lett., 50(3):229-239, 2003. [PDF] Keyword(s): bifurcations, adaptive control.
    Abstract:
    This paper studies a feedback regulation problem that arises in at least two different biological applications. The feedback regulation problem under consideration may be interpreted as an adaptive control problem for tuning bifurcation parameters, and it has not been studied in the control literature. The goal of the paper is to formulate this problem and to present some preliminary results.


  9. J. R. Pomerening, E.D. Sontag, and J. E. Ferrell. Building a cell cycle oscillator: hysteresis and bistability in the activation of Cdc2. Nature Cell Biology, 5(4):346-351, 2003. Note: Supplementary materials 2-4 are here: http://www.math.rutgers.edu/(tilde)sontag/FTPDIR/pomerening-sontag-ferrell-additional.pdf. [WWW] [PDF] [doi:10.1038/ncb954] Keyword(s): systems biology, biochemical networks, oscillations, nonlinear stability, dynamical systems, monotone systems.
    Abstract:
    In the early embryonic cell cycle, Cdc2-cyclin B functions like an autonomous oscillator, at whose core is a negative feedback loop: cyclins accumulate and produce active mitotic Cdc2-cyclin B Cdc2 activates the anaphase-promoting complex (APC); the APC then promotes cyclin degradation and resets Cdc2 to its inactive, interphase state. Cdc2 regulation also involves positive feedback4, with active Cdc2-cyclin B stimulating its activator Cdc25 and inactivating its inhibitors Wee1 and Myt1. Under the correct circumstances, these positive feedback loops could function as a bistable trigger for mitosis, and oscillators with bistable triggers may be particularly relevant to biological applications such as cell cycle regulation. This paper examined whether Cdc2 activation is bistable, confirming that the response of Cdc2 to non-degradable cyclin B is temporally abrupt and switchlike, as would be expected if Cdc2 activation were bistable. It is also shown that Cdc2 activation exhibits hysteresis, a property of bistable systems with particular relevance to biochemical oscillators. These findings help establish the basic systems-level logic of the mitotic oscillator.


  10. E.D. Sontag. A remark on the converging-input converging-state property. IEEE Trans. Automat. Control, 48(2):313-314, 2003. [PDF]
    Abstract:
    Suppose that an equilibrium is asymptotically stable when external inputs vanish. Then, every bounded trajectory which corresponds to a control which approaches zero and which lies in the domain of attraction of the unforced system, must also converge to the equilibrium. This "well-known" but hard-to-cite fact is proved and slightly generalized here.


  11. E.D. Sontag. Adaptation and regulation with signal detection implies internal model. Systems Control Lett., 50(2):119-126, 2003. [PDF] Keyword(s): biological adaptation, internal model principle.
    Abstract:
    This note provides a simple result showing, under suitable technical assumptions, that if a system S adapts to a class of external signals U, then S must necessarily contain a subsystem which is capable of generating all the signals in U. It is not assumed that regulation is robust, nor is there a prior requirement for the system to be partitioned into separate plant and controller components. Instead, a "signal detection" capability is imposed. These weaker assumptions make the result better applicable to cellular phenomena such as the adaptation of E-coli chemotactic tumbling rate to constant concentrations.


  12. E.D. Sontag and M. Krichman. An example of a GAS system which can be destabilized by an integrable perturbation. IEEE Trans. Automat. Control, 48(6):1046-1049, 2003. [PDF] Keyword(s): nonlinear stability.
    Abstract:
    A construction is given of a globally asymptotically stable time-invariant system which can be destabilized by some integrable perturbation. Besides its intrinsic interest, this serves to provide counterexamples to an open question regarding Lyapunov functions.


Conference articles
  1. D. Angeli and E.D. Sontag. A note on multistability and monotone I/O systems. In Proc. IEEE Conf. Decision and Control, Maui, Dec. 2003, IEEE Publications, 2003, pages 67-72, 2003. Keyword(s): systems biology, biochemical networks, nonlinear stability, dynamical systems, monotone systems.


  2. M. Malisoff, L. Rifford, and E.D. Sontag. Remarks on input to state stabilization. In Proc. IEEE Conf. Decision and Control, Maui, Dec. 2003, IEEE Publications, 2003, pages 1053-1058, 2003. [PDF] Keyword(s): nonlinear control, feedback stabilization.


  3. L. Moreau, E.D. Sontag, and M. Arcak. How feedback can tune a bifurcation parameter towards its unknown critical bifurcation value. In Proc. IEEE Conf. Decision and Control, Maui, Dec. 2003, IEEE Publications, 2003, pages 2401-2406, 2003.



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