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Publications about 'signal transduction networks'
Articles in journal or book chapters
  1. A.C. Jiang, A. C. Ventura, E. D. Sontag, S. D. Merajver, A. J. Ninfa, and D. Del Vecchio. Load-induced modulation of signal transduction networks. Science Signaling, 4, issue 194:ra67, 2011. [PDF] Keyword(s): systems biology, biochemical networks, synthetic biology, futile cycles, singular perturbations, modularity.
    Abstract:
    Biological signal transduction networks are commonly viewed as circuits that pass along in the process amplifying signals, enhancing sensitivity, or performing other signal-processing to transcriptional and other components. Here, we report on a "reverse-causality" phenomenon, which we call load-induced modulation. Through a combination of analytical and experimental tools, we discovered that signaling was modulated, in a surprising way, by downstream targets that receive the signal and, in doing so, apply what in physics is called a load. Specifically, we found that non-intuitive changes in response dynamics occurred for a covalent modification cycle when load was present. Loading altered the response time of a system, depending on whether the activity of one of the enzymes was maximal and the other was operating at its minimal rate or whether both enzymes were operating at submaximal rates. These two conditions, which we call "limit regime" and "intermediate regime," were associated with increased or decreased response times, respectively. The bandwidth, the range of frequency in which the system can process information, decreased in the presence of load, suggesting that downstream targets participate in establishing a balance between noise-filtering capabilities and a s ability to process high-frequency stimulation. Nodes in a signaling network are not independent relay devices, but rather are modulated by their downstream targets


  2. R. Albert, B. Dasgupta, and E.D. Sontag. Inference of signal transduction networks from double causal evidence. In David Fenyö, editor, Computational Biology, Methods in Molecular Biology vol. 673, pages 239-251. Springer, 2010. [PDF] Keyword(s): systems biology, biochemical networks, algorithms, signal transduction networks, graph algorithms.
    Abstract:
    We present a novel computational method, and related software, to synthesize signal transduction networks from single and double causal evidence.


  3. R. Albert, B. Dasgupta, R. Dondi, and E.D. Sontag. Inferring (biological) signal transduction networks via transitive reductions of directed graphs. Algorithmica, 51:129-159, 2008. [PDF] [doi:10.1007/s00453-007-9055-0] Keyword(s): systems biology, biochemical networks, algorithms, signal transduction networks, graph algorithms.
    Abstract:
    The transitive reduction problem is that of inferring a sparsest possible biological signal transduction network consistent with a set of experimental observations, with a goal to minimize false positive inferences even if risking false negatives. This paper provides computational complexity results as well as approximation algorithms with guaranteed performance.


  4. S. Kachalo, R. Zhang, E.D. Sontag, R. Albert, and B. Dasgupta. NET-SYNTHESIS: A software for synthesis, inference and simplification of signal transduction networks. Bioinformatics, 24:293 - 295, 2008. [PDF] Keyword(s): systems biology, biochemical networks, algorithms, signal transduction networks, graph algorithms.
    Abstract:
    This paper presents a software tool for inference and simplification of signal transduction networks. The method relies on the representation of observed indirect causal relationships as network paths, using techniques from combinatorial optimization to find the sparsest graph consistent with all experimental observations. We illustrate the biological usability of our software by applying it to a previously published signal transduction network and by using it to synthesize and simplify a novel network corresponding to activation-induced cell death in large granular lymphocyte leukemia.


  5. R. Albert, B. DasGupta, R. Dondi, S. Kachalo, E.D. Sontag, A. Zelikovsky, and K. Westbrooks. A novel method for signal transduction network inference from indirect experimental evidence. In R. Giancarlo and S. Hannenhalli, editors, 7th Workshop on Algorithms in Bioinformatics (WABI), volume 14, pages 407-419. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2007. Note: Conference version of journal paper with same title. Keyword(s): systems biology, biochemical networks, algorithms, signal transduction networks, graph algorithms.


  6. R. Albert, B. DasGupta, R. Dondi, S. Kachalo, E.D. Sontag, A. Zelikovsky, and K. Westbrooks. A novel method for signal transduction network inference from indirect experimental evidence. Journal of Computational Biology, 14:927-949, 2007. [PDF] Keyword(s): systems biology, biochemical networks, algorithms, signal transduction networks, graph algorithms.
    Abstract:
    This paper introduces a new method of combined synthesis and inference of biological signal transduction networks. The main idea lies in representing observed causal relationships as network paths, and using techniques from combinatorial optimization to find the sparsest graph consistent with all experimental observations. The paper formalizes the approach, studies its computational complexity, proves new results for exact and approximate solutions of the computationally hard transitive reduction substep of the approach, validates the biological applicability by applying it to a previously published signal transduction network by Li et al., and shows that the algorithm for the transitive reduction substep performs well on graphs with a structure similar to those observed in transcriptional regulatory and signal transduction networks.


  7. D. Angeli, J. E. Ferrell, and E.D. Sontag. Detection of multistability, bifurcations, and hysteresis in a large class of biological positive-feedback systems.. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 101(7):1822-1827, 2004. Note: A revision of Suppl. Fig. 7(b) is here: http://www.math.rutgers.edu/(tilde)sontag/FTPDIR/nullclines-f-g-REV.jpg; and typos can be found here: http://www.math.rutgers.edu/(tilde)sontag/FTPDIR/angeli-ferrell-sontag-pnas04-errata.txt. [WWW] [PDF] [doi:10.1073/pnas.0308265100] Keyword(s): multistability, systems biology, biochemical networks, nonlinear stability, dynamical systems, monotone systems.
    Abstract:
    Multistability is an important recurring theme in cell signaling, of particular relevance to biological systems that switch between discrete states, generate oscillatory responses, or "remember" transitory stimuli. Standard mathematical methods allow the detection of bistability in some very simple feedback systems (systems with one or two proteins or genes that either activate each other or inhibit each other), but realistic depictions of signal transduction networks are invariably much more complex than this. Here we show that for a class of feedback systems of arbitrary order, the stability properties of the system can be deduced mathematically from how the system behaves when feedback is blocked. Provided that this "open loop," feedback-blocked system is monotone and possesses a sigmoidal characteristic, the system is guaranteed to be bistable for some range of feedback strengths. We present a simple graphical method for deducing the stability behavior and bifurcation diagrams for such systems, and illustrate the method with two examples taken from recent experimental studies of bistable systems: a two-variable Cdc2/Wee1 system and a more complicated five-variable MAPK cascade.



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