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Publications about 'oscillations'
Articles in journal or book chapters
  1. E.V. Nikolaev, S.J. Rahi, and E.D. Sontag. Chaos in simple periodically-forced biological models. 2017. Note: Submitted. Preprint: biorxiv 10.1101/145201.[PDF] Keyword(s): chaos, entrainment, systems biology, periodic inputs, subharmonic responses, biochemical systems, forced oscillations.
    Abstract:
    What complicated dynamics can arise in the simplest biochemical systems, in response to a periodic input? This paper discusses two models that commonly appear as components of larger sensing and signal transduction pathways in systems biology: a simple two-species negative feedback loop, and a prototype nonlinear integral feedback. These systems have globally attracting steady states when unforced, yet, when subject to a periodic excitation, subharmonic responses and strange attractors can arise via period-doubling cascades. These behaviors are similar to those exhibited by classical forced nonlinear oscillators such as those described by van der Pol or Duffing equations. The lack of entrainment to external oscillations, in even the simplest biochemical networks, represents a level of additional complexity in molecular biology.


  2. S. J. Rahi, J. Larsch, K. Pecani, N. Mansouri, A. Y. Katsov, K. Tsaneva-Atanasova, E. D. Sontag, and F. R. Cross. Oscillatory stimuli differentiate adapting circuit topologies. Nature Methods, 14:1010-1016, 2017. [PDF] Keyword(s): biochemical networks, periodic behaviors, monotone systems, entrainment, oscillations.
    Abstract:
    Elucidating the structure of biological intracellular networks from experimental data remains a major challenge. This paper studies two types of ``response signatures'' to identify specific circuit motifs, from the observed response to periodic inputs. In particular, the objective is to distinguish negative feedback loops (NFLs) from incoherent feedforward loops (IFFLs), which are two types of circuits capable of producing exact adaptation. The theory of monotone systems with inputs is used to show that ``period skipping'' (non-harmonic responses) is ruled out in IFFL's, and a notion called ``refractory period stabilization'' is also analyzed. The approach is then applied to identify a circuit dominating cell cycle timing in yeast, and to uncover a calcium-mediated NFL circuit in \emph{C.elegans} olfactory sensory neurons.


  3. A. Rendall and E. D. Sontag. Multiple steady states and the form of response functions to antigen in a model for the initiation of T cell activation. Royal Society Open Science, 2017. Note: To appear. [PDF]
    Abstract:
    This paper analizes a model for the initial stage of T cell activation. The state variables in the model are the concentrations of phosphorylation states of the T cell receptor complex and the phosphatase SHP-1 in the cell. It is shown that these quantities cannot approach zero, and that there is more than one positive steady state for certain values of the parameters; in addition, damped oscillations are possible. It is also shown that the chemical concentration which represents the degree of activation of the cell, represented by the maximally phosphorylated form of the T cell receptor complex, is in general a non-monotone function of the activating signal. In particular there are cases where there is a value of the dissociation constant of the ligand from the receptor which produces an optimal activation of the T cell. In this way the results of certain simulations in the literature have been confirmed rigorously and new features are discovered.


  4. E.V. Nikolaev and E.D. Sontag. Quorum-sensing synchronization of synthetic toggle switches: A design based on monotone dynamical systems theory. PLoS Computational Biology, 12:e1004881, 2016. [PDF] Keyword(s): quorum sensing, toggle switches, monotone systems.
    Abstract:
    Synthetic constructs in biotechnology, bio-computing, and proposed gene therapy interventions are often based on plasmids or transfected circuits which implement some form of on-off (toggle or flip-flop) switch. For example, the expression of a protein used for therapeutic purposes might be triggered by the recognition of a specific combination of inducers (e.g., antigens), and memory of this event should be maintained across a cell population until a specific stimulus commands a coordinated shut-off. The robustness of such a design is hampered by molecular (intrinsic) or environmental (extrinsic) noise, which may lead to spontaneous changes of state in a subset of the population and is reflected in the bimodality of protein expression, as measured for example using flow cytometry. In this context, a majority-vote correction circuit, which brings deviant cells back into the required state, is highly desirable. To address this concrete challenge, we have developed a new theoretical design for quorum-sensing (QS) synthetic toggles. QS provides a way for cells to broadcast their states to the population as a whole so as to facilitate consensus. Our design is endowed with strong theoretical guarantees, based on monotone dynamical systems theory, of global stability and no oscillations, and which leads to robust consensus states.


  5. M. Margaliot, E.D. Sontag, and T. Tuller. Entrainment to periodic initiation and transition rates in a computational model for gene translation. PLoS ONE, 9(5):e96039, 2014. [WWW] [PDF] [doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0096039] Keyword(s): ribosomes, entrainment, nonlinear systems, stability, contractions, contractive systems.
    Abstract:
    A recent biological study has demonstrated that the gene expression pattern entrains to a periodically varying abundance of tRNA molecules. This motivates developing mathematical tools for analyzing entrainment of translation elongation to intra-cellular signals such as tRNAs levels and other factors affecting translation. We consider a recent deterministic mathematical model for translation called the Ribosome Flow Model (RFM). We analyze this model under the assumption that the elongation rate of the tRNA genes and/or the initiation rate are periodic functions with a common period T. We show that the protein synthesis pattern indeed converges to a unique periodic trajectory with period T. The analysis is based on introducing a novel property of dynamical systems, called contraction after a short transient (CAST), that may be of independent interest. We provide a sufficient condition for CAST and use it to prove that the RFM is CAST, and that this implies entrainment. Our results support the conjecture that periodic oscillations in tRNA levels and other factors related to the translation process can induce periodic oscillations in protein levels, and suggest a new approach for engineering genes to obtain a desired, periodic, synthesis rate.


  6. D. Angeli and E.D. Sontag. Oscillations in I/O monotone systems. IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems, Special Issue on Systems Biology, 55:166-176, 2008. Note: Preprint version in arXiv q-bio.QM/0701018, 14 Jan 2007. [PDF] Keyword(s): monotone systems, hopf bifurcations, circadian rhythms, tridiagonal systems, nonlinear dynamics, systems biology, biochemical networks, oscillations, periodic behavior.
    Abstract:
    In this note, we show how certain properties of Goldbeter's 1995 model for circadian oscillations can be proved mathematically, using techniques from the recently developed theory of monotone systems with inputs and outputs. The theory establishes global asymptotic stability, and in particular no oscillations, if the rate of transcription is somewhat smaller than that assumed by Goldbeter, based on the application of a tight small gain condition. This stability persists even under arbitrary delays in the feedback loop. On the other hand, when the condition is violated a Poincare'-Bendixson result allows to conclude existence of oscillations, for sufficiently high delays.


  7. T. Gedeon and E.D. Sontag. Oscillations in multi-stable monotone systems with slowly varying feedback. J. of Differential Equations, 239:273-295, 2007. [PDF] Keyword(s): systems biology, biochemical networks, nonlinear stability, dynamical systems, monotone systems.
    Abstract:
    This paper gives a theorem showing that a slow feedback adaptation, acting entirely analogously to the role of negative feedback for ordinary relaxation oscillations, leads to periodic orbits for bistable monotone systems. The proof is based upon a combination of i/o monotone systems theory and Conley Index theory.


  8. G.A. Enciso and E.D. Sontag. On the stability of a model of testosterone dynamics. J. Math. Biol., 49(6):627-634, 2004. [PDF] Keyword(s): systems biology, biochemical networks, nonlinear stability, dynamical systems, monotone systems.
    Abstract:
    We prove the global asymptotic stability of a well-known delayed negative-feedback model of testosterone dynamics, which has been proposed as a model of oscillatory behavior. We establish stability (and hence the impossibility of oscillations) even in the presence of delays of arbitrary length.


  9. L. Moreau and E.D. Sontag. Balancing at the border of instability. Phys. Rev. E (3), 68(2):020901, 4, 2003. [PDF] Keyword(s): bifurcations, adaptive control.
    Abstract:
    Some biological systems operate at the critical point between stability and instability and this requires a fine-tuning of parameters. We bring together two examples from the literature that illustrate this: neural integration in the nervous system and hair cell oscillations in the auditory system. In both examples the question arises as to how the required fine-tuning may be achieved and maintained in a robust and reliable way. We study this question using tools from nonlinear and adaptive control theory. We illustrate our approach on a simple model which captures some of the essential features of neural integration. As a result, we propose a large class of feedback adaptation rules that may be responsible for the experimentally observed robustness of neural integration. We mention extensions of our approach to the case of hair cell oscillations in the ear.


  10. J. R. Pomerening, E.D. Sontag, and J. E. Ferrell. Building a cell cycle oscillator: hysteresis and bistability in the activation of Cdc2. Nature Cell Biology, 5(4):346-351, 2003. Note: Supplementary materials 2-4 are here: http://www.math.rutgers.edu/(tilde)sontag/FTPDIR/pomerening-sontag-ferrell-additional.pdf. [WWW] [PDF] [doi:10.1038/ncb954] Keyword(s): systems biology, biochemical networks, oscillations, nonlinear stability, dynamical systems, monotone systems.
    Abstract:
    In the early embryonic cell cycle, Cdc2-cyclin B functions like an autonomous oscillator, at whose core is a negative feedback loop: cyclins accumulate and produce active mitotic Cdc2-cyclin B Cdc2 activates the anaphase-promoting complex (APC); the APC then promotes cyclin degradation and resets Cdc2 to its inactive, interphase state. Cdc2 regulation also involves positive feedback4, with active Cdc2-cyclin B stimulating its activator Cdc25 and inactivating its inhibitors Wee1 and Myt1. Under the correct circumstances, these positive feedback loops could function as a bistable trigger for mitosis, and oscillators with bistable triggers may be particularly relevant to biological applications such as cell cycle regulation. This paper examined whether Cdc2 activation is bistable, confirming that the response of Cdc2 to non-degradable cyclin B is temporally abrupt and switchlike, as would be expected if Cdc2 activation were bistable. It is also shown that Cdc2 activation exhibits hysteresis, a property of bistable systems with particular relevance to biochemical oscillators. These findings help establish the basic systems-level logic of the mitotic oscillator.


  11. E.D. Sontag. Asymptotic amplitudes and Cauchy gains: A small-gain principle and an application to inhibitory biological feedback. Systems Control Lett., 47(2):167-179, 2002. [PDF] Keyword(s): cyclic feedback systems, small-gain.
    Abstract:
    The notions of asymptotic amplitude for signals, and Cauchy gain for input/output systems, and an associated small-gain principle, are introduced. These concepts allow the consideration of systems with multiple, and possibly feedback-dependent, steady states. A Lyapunov-like characterization allows the computation of gains for state-space systems, and the formulation of sufficient conditions insuring the lack of oscillations and chaotic behaviors in a wide variety of cascades and feedback loops. An application in biology (MAPK signaling) is worked out in detail.


Conference articles
  1. D. Angeli and E.D. Sontag. An analysis of a circadian model using the small-gain approach to monotone systems. In Proc. IEEE Conf. Decision and Control, Paradise Island, Bahamas, Dec. 2004, IEEE Publications, pages 575-578, 2004. [PDF] Keyword(s): circadian rhythms, tridiagonal systems, nonlinear dynamics, systems biology, biochemical networks, oscillations, periodic behavior, monotone systems.
    Abstract:
    We show how certain properties of Goldbeter's original 1995 model for circadian oscillations can be proved mathematically. We establish global asymptotic stability, and in particular no oscillations, if the rate of transcription is somewhat smaller than that assumed by Goldbeter, but, on the other hand, this stability persists even under arbitrary delays in the feedback loop. We are mainly interested in illustrating certain mathematical techniques, including the use of theorems concerning tridiagonal cooperative systems and the recently developed theory of monotone systems with inputs and outputs.



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Last modified: Thu Nov 23 10:40:56 2017
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