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Publications about 'graph algorithms'
Articles in journal or book chapters
  1. R. Albert, B. Dasgupta, and E.D. Sontag. Inference of signal transduction networks from double causal evidence. In David Fenyö, editor, Computational Biology, Methods in Molecular Biology vol. 673, pages 239-251. Springer, 2010. [PDF] Keyword(s): systems biology, biochemical networks, algorithms, signal transduction networks, graph algorithms.
    Abstract:
    We present a novel computational method, and related software, to synthesize signal transduction networks from single and double causal evidence.


  2. R. Albert, B. Dasgupta, R. Dondi, and E.D. Sontag. Inferring (biological) signal transduction networks via transitive reductions of directed graphs. Algorithmica, 51:129-159, 2008. [PDF] [doi:10.1007/s00453-007-9055-0] Keyword(s): systems biology, biochemical networks, algorithms, signal transduction networks, graph algorithms.
    Abstract:
    The transitive reduction problem is that of inferring a sparsest possible biological signal transduction network consistent with a set of experimental observations, with a goal to minimize false positive inferences even if risking false negatives. This paper provides computational complexity results as well as approximation algorithms with guaranteed performance.


  3. S. Kachalo, R. Zhang, E.D. Sontag, R. Albert, and B. Dasgupta. NET-SYNTHESIS: A software for synthesis, inference and simplification of signal transduction networks. Bioinformatics, 24:293 - 295, 2008. [PDF] Keyword(s): systems biology, biochemical networks, algorithms, signal transduction networks, graph algorithms.
    Abstract:
    This paper presents a software tool for inference and simplification of signal transduction networks. The method relies on the representation of observed indirect causal relationships as network paths, using techniques from combinatorial optimization to find the sparsest graph consistent with all experimental observations. We illustrate the biological usability of our software by applying it to a previously published signal transduction network and by using it to synthesize and simplify a novel network corresponding to activation-induced cell death in large granular lymphocyte leukemia.


  4. R. Albert, B. DasGupta, R. Dondi, S. Kachalo, E.D. Sontag, A. Zelikovsky, and K. Westbrooks. A novel method for signal transduction network inference from indirect experimental evidence. In R. Giancarlo and S. Hannenhalli, editors, 7th Workshop on Algorithms in Bioinformatics (WABI), volume 14, pages 407-419. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2007. Note: Conference version of journal paper with same title. Keyword(s): systems biology, biochemical networks, algorithms, signal transduction networks, graph algorithms.


  5. R. Albert, B. DasGupta, R. Dondi, S. Kachalo, E.D. Sontag, A. Zelikovsky, and K. Westbrooks. A novel method for signal transduction network inference from indirect experimental evidence. Journal of Computational Biology, 14:927-949, 2007. [PDF] Keyword(s): systems biology, biochemical networks, algorithms, signal transduction networks, graph algorithms.
    Abstract:
    This paper introduces a new method of combined synthesis and inference of biological signal transduction networks. The main idea lies in representing observed causal relationships as network paths, and using techniques from combinatorial optimization to find the sparsest graph consistent with all experimental observations. The paper formalizes the approach, studies its computational complexity, proves new results for exact and approximate solutions of the computationally hard transitive reduction substep of the approach, validates the biological applicability by applying it to a previously published signal transduction network by Li et al., and shows that the algorithm for the transitive reduction substep performs well on graphs with a structure similar to those observed in transcriptional regulatory and signal transduction networks.


  6. P. Berman, B. Dasgupta, and E.D. Sontag. Algorithmic issues in reverse engineering of protein and gene networks via the modular response analysis method. Annals of the NY Academy of Sciences, 1115:132-141, 2007. [PDF] Keyword(s): systems biology, biochemical networks, gene and protein networks, reverse engineering, systems identification, graph algorithms.
    Abstract:
    This paper studies a computational problem motivated by the modular response analysis method for reverse engineering of protein and gene networks. This set-cover problem is hard to solve exactly for large networks, but efficient approximation algorithms are given and their complexity is analyzed.



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Last modified: Thu Nov 23 10:40:56 2017
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