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Publications about 'gene networks'
Articles in journal or book chapters
  1. M. A. Al-Radhawi, D. Del Vecchio, and E. D. Sontag. Multi-modality in gene regulatory networks with slow gene binding. 2017. Note: Submitted. Preprint in arXiv:1705.02330, May 2017 rev Nov 2017. [PDF] Keyword(s): multistability, gene networks, Markov Chains, Master Equation, cancer heterogeneity, phenotypic variation, nonlinear systems, stochastic models, epigenetics.
    Abstract:
    In biological processes such as embryonic development, hematopoietic cell differentiation, and the arising of tumor heterogeneity and consequent resistance to therapy, mechanisms of gene activation and deactivation may play a role in the emergence of phenotypically heterogeneous yet genetically identical (clonal) cellular populations. Mathematically, the variability in phenotypes in the absence of genetic variation can be modeled through the existence of multiple metastable attractors in nonlinear systems subject with stochastic switching, each one of them associated to an alternative epigenetic state. An important theoretical and practical question is that of estimating the number and location of these states, as well as their relative probabilities of occurrence. This paper focuses on a rigorous analytic characterization of multiple modes under slow promoter kinetics, which is a feature of epigenetic regulation. It characterizes the stationary distributions of Chemical Master Equations for gene regulatory networks as a mixture of Poisson distributions. As illustrations, the theory is used to tease out the role of cooperative binding in stochastic models in comparison to deterministic models, and applications are given to various model systems, such as toggle switches in isolation or in communicating populations and a trans-differentiation network.


  2. T. Kang, R. Moore, Y. Li, E.D. Sontag, and L. Bleris. Discriminating direct and indirect connectivities in biological networks. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 112:12893-12898, 2015. [PDF] Keyword(s): modular response analysis, stochastic systems, reverse engineering, gene networks, synthetic biology.
    Abstract:
    Reverse engineering of biological pathways involves an iterative process between experiments, data processing, and theoretical analysis. In this work, we engineer synthetic circuits, subject them to perturbations, and then infer network connections using a combination of nonparametric single-cell data resampling and modular response analysis. Intriguingly, we discover that recovered weights of specific network edges undergo divergent shifts under differential perturbations, and that the particular behavior is markedly different between different topologies. Investigating topological changes under differential perturbations may address the longstanding problem of discriminating direct and indirect connectivities in biological networks.


  3. M. Miller, M. Hafner, E.D. Sontag, N. Davidsohn, S. Subramanian, P. E. M. Purnick, D. Lauffenburger, and R. Weiss. Modular design of artificial tissue homeostasis: robust control through synthetic cellular heterogeneity. PLoS Computational Biology, 8:e1002579-, 2012. [PDF] Keyword(s): systems biology, homeostasis, stem cells, synthetic biology.
    Abstract:
    Synthetic biology efforts have largely focused on small engineered gene networks, yet understanding how to integrate multiple synthetic modules and interface them with endogenous pathways remains a challenge. Here we present the design, system integration, and analysis of several large scale synthetic gene circuits for artificial tissue homeostasis. Diabetes therapy represents a possible application for engineered homeostasis, where genetically programmed stem cells maintain a steady population of beta-cells despite continuous turnover. We develop a new iterative process that incorporates modular design principles with hierarchical performance optimization targeted for environments with uncertainty and incomplete information. We employ theoretical analysis and computational simulations of multicellular reaction/diffusion models to design and understand system behavior, and find that certain features often associated with robustness (e.g., multicellular synchronization and noise attenuation) are actually detrimental for tissue homeostasis. We overcome these problems by engineering a new class of genetic modules for 'synthetic cellular heterogeneity' that function to generate beneficial population diversity. We design two such modules (an asynchronous genetic oscillator and a signaling throttle mechanism), demonstrate their capacity for enhancing robust control, and provide guidance for experimental implementation with various computational techniques. We found that designing modules for synthetic heterogeneity can be complex, and in general requires a framework for non-linear and multifactorial analysis. Consequently, we adapt a 'phenotypic sensitivity analysis' method to determine how functional module behaviors combine to achieve optimal system performance. We ultimately combine this analysis with Bayesian network inference to extract critical, causal relationships between a module's biochemical rate-constants, its high level functional behavior in isolation, and its impact on overall system performance once integrated.


  4. E.D. Sontag. Monotone and near-monotone systems. In I. Queinnec, S. Tarbouriech, G. Garcia, and S-I. Niculescu, editors, Biology and Control Theory: Current Challenges (Lecture Notes in Control and Information Sciences Volume 357), pages 79-122. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2007. Note: Conference version of ``Monotone and near-monotone biochemical networks,'' basically the same paper.Keyword(s): systems biology, biochemical networks, monotone systems, Ising spin models, nonlinear stability, dynamical systems, consistent graphs, gene networks.
    Abstract:
    See abstract and pdf for ``Monotone and near-monotone biochemical networks''.


  5. P. Berman, B. Dasgupta, and E.D. Sontag. Algorithmic issues in reverse engineering of protein and gene networks via the modular response analysis method. Annals of the NY Academy of Sciences, 1115:132-141, 2007. [PDF] Keyword(s): systems biology, biochemical networks, gene and protein networks, reverse engineering, systems identification, graph algorithms.
    Abstract:
    This paper studies a computational problem motivated by the modular response analysis method for reverse engineering of protein and gene networks. This set-cover problem is hard to solve exactly for large networks, but efficient approximation algorithms are given and their complexity is analyzed.


  6. P. Berman, B. Dasgupta, and E.D. Sontag. Randomized approximation algorithms for set multicover problems with applications to reverse engineering of protein and gene networks. Discrete Applied Mathematics Special Series on Computational Molecular Biology, 155:733-749, 2007. [PDF] Keyword(s): systems biology, biochemical networks, gene and protein networks, systems identification, reverse engineering.
    Abstract:
    This paper investigates computational complexity aspects of a combinatorial problem that arises in the reverse engineering of protein and gene networks, showing relations to an appropriate set multicover problem with large "coverage" factor, and providing a non-trivial analysis of a simple randomized polynomial-time approximation algorithm for the problem.


  7. E.D. Sontag. Monotone and near-monotone biochemical networks. Systems and Synthetic Biology, 1:59-87, 2007. [PDF] [doi:10.1007/s11693-007-9005-9] Keyword(s): systems biology, biochemical networks, monotone systems, Ising spin models, nonlinear stability, dynamical systems, consistent graphs, gene networks.
    Abstract:
    This paper provides an expository introduction to monotone and near-monotone biochemical network structures. Monotone systems respond in a predictable fashion to perturbations, and have very robust dynamical characteristics. This makes them reliable components of more complex networks, and suggests that natural biological systems may have evolved to be, if not monotone, at least close to monotone. In addition, interconnections of monotone systems may be fruitfully analyzed using tools from control theory.


  8. M. Andrec, B.N. Kholodenko, R.M. Levy, and E.D. Sontag. Inference of signaling and gene regulatory networks by steady-state perturbation experiments: structure and accuracy. J. Theoret. Biol., 232(3):427-441, 2005. Note: Supplementary materials are here: http://www.math.rutgers.edu/(tilde)sontag/FTPDIR/andrec-kholodenko-levy-sontag-JTB04-supplementary.pdf. [PDF] Keyword(s): systems biology, biochemical networks, gene and protein networks, systems identification, reverse engineering.
    Abstract:
    One of the fundamental problems of cell biology is the understanding of complex regulatory networks. Such networks are ubiquitous in cells, and knowledge of their properties is essential for the understanding of cellular behavior. This paper studies the effect of experimental uncertainty on the accuracy of the inferred structure of the networks determined using the method in "Untangling the wires: a novel strategy to trace functional interactions in signaling and gene networks".


  9. B.N. Kholodenko, A. Kiyatkin, F.J. Bruggeman, E.D. Sontag, H.V. Westerhoff, and J. Hoek. Untangling the wires: a novel strategy to trace functional interactions in signaling and gene networks. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, 99:12841-12846, 2002. [PDF] Keyword(s): systems biology, biochemical networks, reverse engineering, gene and protein networks, protein networks, gene networks, systems identification.
    Abstract:
    Emerging technologies have enabled the acquisition of large genomics and proteomics data sets. This paper proposes a novel quantitative method for determining functional interactions in cellular signaling and gene networks. It can be used to explore cell systems at a mechanistic level, or applied within a modular framework, which dramatically decreases the number of variables to be assayed. The topology and strength of network connections are retrieved from experimentally measured network responses to successive perturbations of all modules. In addition, the method can reveal functional interactions even when the components of the system are not all known, in which case some connections retrieved by the analysis will not be direct but correspond to the interaction routes through unidentified elements. The method is tested and illustrated using computer-generated responses of a modeled MAPK cascade and gene network.


Conference articles
  1. N.S. Kumar, M. A. Al-Radhawi, D. Del Vecchio, and E. D. Sontag. Stochasticity is necessary for multiple attractors in a class of differentiation networks. In 2017 American Control Conference (ACC), pages submitted, 2017. Keyword(s): systems biology, genetic regulatory, multistability, gene networks.
    Abstract:
    Deterministic models remain the most common option for modeling gene regulatory networks even when the underlying assumptions of high copy numbers and fast promoter kinetics are unsatisfied. Here, we analyze a widely studied differentiation network motif known as the PU.1-GATA-1 circuit and we show that an ODE model of the biomolecular reactions consistent with known biology is incapable of exhibiting multistability, a defining behaviour for such a network. Thus, we consider the chemical master equation model of the same biomolecular reactions and using results recently developed by the authors, we analytically construct the stationary distribution. We show that this distribution is indeed capable of admitting a multitude of modes. We illustrate the results with a numerical example.



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Last modified: Thu Nov 23 10:40:56 2017
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