Mathematics Department - Math 573 - Numerical Analysis I

Math 573 - Numerical Analysis I

Course Description

This is the first part of a general survey of the basic topics in numerical analysis – the study and analysis of numerical algorithms for approximating the solution of a variety of generic problems which occur in applications. In the fall semester, we will consider the approximation of functions by polynomials and piecewise polynomials, numerical integration, and the numerical solution of initial value problems for ordinary differential equations, and see how all these problems are related.

In the spring semester (642:574), we will study the numerical solution of linear systems of equations, the approximation of matrix eigenvalues and eigenvectors, the numerical solution of nonlinear systems of equations, numerical techniques for unconstrained function minimization, finite difference and finite element methods for two-point boundary value problems, and finite difference methods for some model problems in partial differential equations.

Despite the many solution techniques presented in elementary calculus and differential equations courses, mathematical models used in applications often do not have the simple forms required for using these methods. Hence, a quantitative understanding of the models requires the use of numerical approximation schemes. This course provides the mathematical background for understanding how such schemes are derived and when they are likely to work.

To illustrate the theory, in addition to the usual pencil and paper problems, some short computer programs will be assigned. To minimize the effort involved, however, the use of Matlab will be encouraged. This program has many built in features which make programming easy, even for those with very little prior programming experience.

Current Semester: Fall 2006


One of the following textbooks is recommended, but not required for the course:

Kendall Atkinson, An Introduction to Numerical Analysis,
John Wiley and Sons, second edition (1989), (ISBN 0-471-62489-6).

A. Quarteroni, R. Sacco, F. Saleri, Numerical Mathematics,
Springer Texts in Applied Mathematics 37 (2000), (ISBN 0-387-98959-5).


Previous semesters:


Comments on this page should be sent to: falk "at" math "dot" rutgers "dot" edu
Last updated: May 10, 2007 by R. S. Falk

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