Math 244 Fall 2005 Sections 1-3: Professor Bumby


Some links



Special Announcements

This course will use Sakai to enhance exchanges of information in the course. Follow the link in the previous sentence to reach the Welcome screen (that looks like this screen shot). Enter your eden username and password in the boxes (in the real welcome screen, not the screen shot), and press the login button. You should be automatically enrolled in any site that has been created for one of your courses (this one is 640:244:[01-03] F05). Those sites will be shown in a row of tabs at the top of the window. Your use of Sakai is coordinated through a site called My Workspace. In particular, other sites that can be joined can be found using the Membership menu item in My Workspace. Problems using Sakai should be reported to the student help desk, 732-445-HELP. I can also demonstrate the use of Sakai during my office hours (see my personal home page for a schedule. In many ways, resources are easier to make available through Sakai than through a public web page, and easier to organize there. In addition, Sakai allows for submission of assignments and grading of quizzes. It is planned to use these features to facilitate submission and grading of the Maple Labs. The process for doing this may evolve during the semester as techniques for working with Sakai improve.

This lecture section has registered with the Maple Adoption Program. This is a special program that Maplesoft offers because the Maple laboratory projects are a required part of the course. One benefit of the program is that students in this section may purchase a copy of the Maple 10 Student Edition for the reduced price of $75.00 US (download only). You will need a Special Access Code available from the Maple Adoption folder in the Resources section of the Sakai site for this section.

The lecturer's regular office hours are to be found on his home page, but special office hours for this course will be announced here.



Calendar



Lecture details

The textbook exercises done as examples in lecture will be listed here. For many of these, Maple's solution will also be shown and interpreted. These Maple worksheets will be available for download so you can step through them. Although the exams will emphasize pencil-and-paper solutions, you may find Maple's solutions useful in refining your approach to the exercises. In some cases, the Maple worksheet will be shown in lecture, but Maple versions will be posted whenever they reflect the lecture, however the exercise was done in lecture. These worksheets are primarily for working through as a partial record of the lecture, since they are posted in bare form with output removed. You should download it and step through the worksheet in Maple 10. You may also modify this copy to investigate related questions. In some cases, sections were revisited in later lectures. Examples done on later visits will be added to original list (in parentheses).

3.8, 4.2
Date Section Exercises Maple
Sep. 07 2.2 2, 5, (6), (7), 10, (14), 21, (23). yes
Sep. 12 2.3 8, 12.  
Sep. 14 2.6 1, 11, 13, 32. yes
Sep. 19 2.4 7, 16. yes
Sep. 21 2.1 14, 16.  
2.5 15.
Sep. 26 2.7, 2.8, 8.* .  
Sep. 28 Exam 1  
Oct. 03 3.1 3, 12, 15.  
7.3 17.
Oct. 05 7.5    
Oct. 10 3.4; 7.6 Examples from notes  
Oct. 12 3.3; 7.7    
Oct. 17 3.5 11, 15.  
7.8 7.
Oct. 19 review  
Oct. 24 Exam 2  
Oct. 26    
Oct. 31 3.7 3, (15). yes
4.4  
7.9 (part) 3, 7.
Nov. 02 3.6, 4.3, 7.9 (part)    
Nov. 07 3.9    
Nov. 09 9.1, 9.2    
Nov. 14 review  
Nov. 16 Exam 3  

Lectures leading up to Exam 4 are not shown. While they could be linked to sections of the textbook, the plan of the lectures was given in the notes on series solutions.



Maple

As new versions of the Maple assignments are prepared, they will be linked here as well as on the course page and the semester page.



Grading

The course grades will be based on a ranking on a 700 point scale composed of the following items:

An effort will be made to respect any clustering of grades in assigning course grades.

Exam 1 has been graded. The average score was 55.6267 and the median was 56. Individual grades have been entered in the FAS Gradebook. There is also a distribution of scores (but no attempt to assign letter grades) and scaled averages (formed by dividing by the maximum possible score [or base score ] and multiplying by 10) for each problem. Scaling allows easy comparison of the difficulty of problems of different weight, since the maximum score is always 10.

Exam 1
Distribution
Range Count
76 - 80 11
71 - 75 7
66 - 70 3
61 - 65 11
56 - 60 6
51 - 55 7
46 - 50 10
41 - 45 8
36 - 40 4
0 - 35 8
Problems
Prob. # Scaled Avg.
1 9.32
2 8.22
3 6.91
4 5.90
5 5.05

Remember that these are grades out of 80. Grades below 40 indicate a serious weakness.


scatter plot of gradesExam 2 has been graded. The average score was 62.59 and the median was 65.5. A scatter plot shows the comparison of grades on this exam with the score on exam 1. The line of positive slope in the figure is a regression line (the line that minimizes the sum of the squares of the vertical distances of the points). (Some lines of slope -1 may be added to show the beginnings of clusters in the total scores.) Individual grades have been entered in the FAS Gradebook. There is also a distribution of scores (but no attempt to assign letter grades) and scaled averages (formed by dividing by the maximum possible score [or base score ] and multiplying by 10) for each problem. Scaling allows easy comparison of the difficulty of problems of different weight, since the maximum score is always 10.

Exam 2
Distribution
Range Count
76 - 80 6
71 - 75 15
66 - 70 14
61 - 65 10
56 - 60 9
51 - 55 6
46 - 50 2
41 - 45 2
0 - 40 6
Problems
Prob. # Scaled Avg.
1 8.27
2 6.13
3 8.63
4 7.60
5 8.57

scatter plot of
grades Exam 3 has been graded. The average score was 53.74 (with a median of 57). A scatter plot shows the comparison of grades on this exam with the sum of the scores on exam 1 and exam 2. The line of positive slope in the figure is a regression line (the line that minimizes the sum of the squares of the vertical distances of the points). Individual grades have been entered in the FAS Gradebook. There is also a distribution of scores (but no attempt to assign letter grades) and scaled averages (formed by dividing by the maximum possible score [or base score ] and multiplying by 10) for each problem. Scaling allows easy comparison of the difficulty of problems of different weight, since the maximum score is always 10.

Exam 3
Distribution
Range Count
75 - 80 4
70 3
65 - 69 6
60 - 64 11
55 - 59 12
50 - 54 10
45 - 49 5
40 - 44 6
35 - 99 5
below 35 5
Problems
Prob. # Scaled Avg.
1 6.59
2 7.90
3 8.30
4 1.59
5 8.35
6 5.82

There were difficulties with problem 4 that made assignment of partial credit difficult. The fairest approach seemed to be to assign credit only for complete or nearly complete solutions. The few with credit will have a nice bonus, but other grades will be judged as though this were a 70 point exam.



scatter plot of
grades Exam 4 has been graded. The average score was 65.33 (with a median of 69). A scatter plot shows the comparison of grades on this exam with the sum of the scores on exam 1 and exam 2. The line of positive slope in the figure is a regression line (the line that minimizes the sum of the squares of the vertical distances of the points). Individual grades have been entered in the FAS Gradebook. There is also a distribution of scores (but no attempt to assign letter grades) and scaled averages (formed by dividing by the maximum possible score [or base score ] and multiplying by 10) for each problem. Scaling allows easy comparison of the difficulty of problems of different weight, since the maximum score is always 10.

Exam 4
Distribution
Range Count
76 - 80 15
71 - 75 15
66 - 70 8
61 - 65 9
56 - 60 5
51 - 55 4
46 - 50 3
0 - 45 5
Problems
Prob. # Scaled Avg.
1 9.41
2 8.61
3 8.76
4 5.98
5 7.90

scatter plot of gradesThis graph shows the relation between recitation grades and exam scores. A correlation line has been added.


scatter plot of gradesThe final exam has been graded and course grade submitted. The scatter plot shows the relation between the total of previous coursework and the exam. As usual. there is a regression line. There are also lines showing totals of 575, 530, 475, 445, 395 marking the divisions between letter grades (more detail is in a table below). Your score on the exam and grade for the course are available in the FAS Gradebook. The average exam score was 151.5 with a median of 156. The tables show the distribution of exam scores and of course grades.

When grades were listed in order, a clear minimal level of competence, corresponding to the lowest passing score, identified itself. The Sakai drop box for each of the students with a lower score contains additional information about grades in various parts of the course.

Summary
Exam
Range Count
190 - 199 7
180 - 189 10
170 - 179 5
160 - 169 8
150 - 159 10
140 - 149 8
130 - 139 2
120 - 129 5
below 120 10
Letter Grades
Grade Range Count
A 578 - 653 18
B+ 531 - 570 13
B 492 - 525 13
C+ 458 - 479 9
C 400 - 433 6
other 432 - 387 6

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Comments on this page should be sent to: bumby@math.rutgers.edu
Last updated: January 02, 2005