Math 244 Fall 2003 Sections 1-3 and 7 Professor Bumby


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Special Announcements

Because of the large demand for this course, a fourth section (Section 07) meeting Thursday 6* in Beck 011 (Livingston Campus) has been added. All applicants for the course will be directed to this section. The class no longer fits in the lecture room originally assigned, and has been relocated; see Calendar entries for September 08 and 10 for details. No change is required in the meeting places of the original recitation classes.

This lecture section has registered with the Maple Adoption Program. This means that the Maple laboratory projects are a required part of the course. This is a new program that includes some benefits.

  1. We are looking into the possibility of a tutorial in the use of Maple conducted (remotely) by a representative of Maplesoft.
  2. Students registered in this lecture section are entitled to purchase a copy of the Student Edition of Maple9 for $75US. Contact the lecturer for more information.

There were reports of difficulty printing Lab 3. I have also noticed printing problems on the systems that I use. In order to develop a workaround and report the problem to Maple to allow it to be corrected, details of printing problems should be reported to bumby@math.rutgers.edu. Use "Maple Printing" as the subject line of your message.

Grades for the Maple Labs have been entered in the FAS Gradebook. The "comments" column contains the scores recorded on the individual labs (including lab 0 even though that did not contribute to the grade). Please report any discrepancies to bumby@math.rutgers.edu.



Calendar



Lecture details

The textbook exercises done as examples in lecture will be listed here.

Date Section Exercises
Sep. 03 1.3 7, 9, 14
Sep. 08 2.2 2, 7, 10, 27(a)
Sep. 10 2.5 9, 16.
2.1 14, 16, 25(part).
Sep. 15 2.6 1, 2, 15.
2.3 7.
2.4 3 (as example of linear equation).
Sep. 17 2.6 21,
after extending previous discussion of 2.1#25 and 2.2#27.
Sep. 22 2.6 22.
Sep. 29 3.1 3.
3.2 4, 23.
4.1 13.
4.2 35.
Oct. 01 3.2 7, 13, 17.
3.3 1, 15, 17.
4.2 29.
Oct. 06 3.2 25.
3.3 9.
3.4 7, 11, 19, 25.
3.5 6, 11.
4.1 21.
4.2 32
Oct. 08 3.5 9, 20, 23.
3.8 A family of examples with different damping terms.
Oct. 13 3.6 1, 6, 7, 13.
4.3 3.
3.9 17.
Oct. 15 3.7 7, 15.
4.4 2
Oct. 22 7.2 1
and examples of calculating eigenvalues and eigenvectors for 2 by 2 systems with integer eigenvalues and 3 by 3 triangular matrices.
Oct. 27 7.6; 7.7 examples from notes
Oct. 29 7.6 1
7.7 7,11
7.8 7
7.9 1
Nov. 03 7.9 3
9.1 5
9.2 5
Nov. 05 9.1 13
9.2 7
9.3 5
Nov. 10 9.4 1.
9.5 1, 3.
9.6, 9.7, 9.8 General discussion only.
Nov. 17 5.2 2, 5, 7, 15, 17, 19.
Nov. 19 5.3 22.
5.5 1, 13.
Nov. 24 5.6 1, 3, 9, 11, 16.
Dec. 01 5.2 6.
5.5 4, 7.
5.6 2, 6.
Dec. 03 notes general examples, including Bessel functions.


Maple

As new versions of the Maple assignments are prepared, they will be linked here as well as on the course page and the semester page.



Grading

The course grades will be based on a ranking on a 700 point scale composed of the following items:

An effort will be made to respect any clustering of grades in assigning course grades.

Exam 1 has been graded. The average score was 44.098 and median was 46. Individual grades have been entered in the FAS Gradebook. There is also a distribution of scores (but no attempt to assign letter grades) and scaled averages (formed my dividing by the maximum possible score [or base score ] and multiplying by 10) for each problem. Scaling allows easy comparison of the difficulty of problems of different weight (although all questions on this exam had the same weight).

Exam 1
Distribution
Range Count
75 - 80 0
70 - 74 7
65 - 69 5
60 - 64 13
55 - 59 9
50 - 54 10
45 - 49 10
40 - 44 6
35 - 39 10
30 - 34 6
25 - 29 6
20 - 24 8
15 - 19 8
below 15 3
Problems
Prob. # Scaled Avg.
1 6.43
2 6.98
3 6.43
4 4.81
5 2.97



Exam 2 has been graded. The average score was 66.112. A scatter plot shows the comparison of grades on this exam with the score on exam 1. The line of positive slope in the figure is a regression line (the line that minimizes the sum of the squares of the vertical distances of the points). There is also a line of slope -1 showing sum of 100, which roughly indicates a satisfactory combined score for determining "warning grades". Individual grades have been entered in the FAS Gradebook. There is also a distribution of scores (but no attempt to assign letter grades) and scaled averages (formed my dividing by the maximum possible score [or base score ] and multiplying by 10) for each problem. Scaling allows easy comparison of the difficulty of problems of different weight.

scatter plot of grades
Exam 2
Distribution
Range Count
80 13
75 - 79 13
70 - 74 19
65 - 69 13
60 - 64 12
56 - 59 10
50 - 54 10
47 - 48 4
37 - 44 4
Problems
Prob. # Scaled Avg.
1 9.34
2 9.82
3 9.00
4 5.95
5 8.69
6 8.18
7 5.86



Exam 3 has been graded. The average score was 51.465, and the median was 55. A scatter plot shows the comparison of grades on this exam with the sum of scores on exams 1 and 2. Only individuals who took all exams are represented in this plot. The line of positive slope in the figure is a regression line (the line that minimizes the sum of the squares of the vertical distances of the points). There are also lines of slope -1 showing sums of 135, 150, 165, 180, 195, 210, and 225 that indicate a tendency for the total grades to be forming gaps at intervals of 15 points. Course grades will be based on a total that also includes Maple, recitation work and the final exam. All of these component should be present before attempting to make qualitative distinctions between grades. Individual exam grades have been entered in the FAS Gradebook. There is also a distribution of scores (but no attempt to assign letter grades) and scaled averages (formed my dividing by the maximum possible score [or base score ] and multiplying by 10) for each problem. Scaling allows easy comparison of the difficulty of problems of different weight.

scatter plot of grades
Exam 3
Distribution
Range Count
80 2
71 - 75 5
66 - 70 15
61 - 64 9
56 - 60 18
51 - 55 8
47 - 50 10
41 - 45 9
38 - 40 5
31 - 35 6
20 - 28 11
below 20 1
Problems
Prob. # Scaled Avg.
1 2.87
2 7.61
3 6.34
4 8.19
5 6.39
6 6.07

Exam 4 has been graded. The average score was 58.389, and the median was 63. A scatter plot shows the comparison of grades on this exam with the sum of scores on exams 1, 2 and 3. Only individuals who took all exams are represented in this plot. The line of positive slope in the figure is a regression line (the line that minimizes the sum of the squares of the vertical distances of the points). There are also lines of slope -1 showing sums of 140, 170, 200, 225, 260, and 275 that indicate a tendency for the total grades to be forming clusters. Course grades will be based on a total that also includes Maple, recitation work and the final exam. All of these component should be present before attempting to make qualitative distinctions between grades. Individual exam grades have been entered in the FAS Gradebook. There is also a distribution of scores (but no attempt to assign letter grades) and scaled averages (formed my dividing by the maximum possible score [or base score ] and multiplying by 10) for each problem. Scaling allows easy comparison of the difficulty of problems of different weight.

scatter plot of grades
Exam 4
Distribution
Range Count
80 6
75 - 79 8
70 - 74 18
65 - 69 11
60 - 64 12
55 - 59 10
50 - 53 5
45 - 49 8
below 45 17
Problems
Prob. # Scaled Avg.
1 3.59
2 7.47
3 8.54
4 6.98
5 8.37


The final exam has been graded and individual exam grades entered in the FAS Gradebook. Median score was 147 out of 200. Other information will be posted when it is available.

scatter plot of grades scatter plot of grades Some scatter plots show comparisons between components of the grade: (1) Maple Labs and class exams; (2) Recitation grades and class exams; (3) Class exams and the final exam. scatter plot of grades


Each problem was closely related to a problem on a class exam. In some cases, the ability to prepare for specific problems gave a better average score (problem 5 from exam 1, problem 1 from exam 3 and problem 1 from exam 4); but in other cases, grade were better the first time (problem 3 from exam 2, problems 2 and 3 from exam 3, problem 2 from exam 4). In the table, the "source" column contains a number of the form m.n where m is the exam number and n is the problem number on that exam.
Final Exam
Distribution
Range Count
190 - 199 1
180 - 189 10
170 - 179 14
160 - 169 9
150 - 159 9
140 - 149 8
130 - 139 4
120 - 129 9
110 - 119 3
100 - 109 4
90 - 99 5
80 - 89 5
70 - 79 3
below 70 9
Problems
Source Prob. # Scaled Avg.
1.1 A1, B9, C5, D13 6.83
1.3 A12, B1, C8, D5 6.54
1.4 A5, B13, C1, D9 4.99
1.5 A9, B5, C13, D1 4.88
2.3 A10, B3, C12, D6 7.94
2.4 A2, B10, C11, D14 7.11
2.6 A6, B14, C9, D2 7.91
2.7 A13, B6, C2, D10 6.08
3.1 A14, B11, C3, D7 6.78
3.2 A11, B7, C14, D3 5.85
3.3 A7, B4, C10, D15 5.01
3.6 A3, B15, C7, D11 6.17
4.1 A8, B2, C6, D4 5.45
4.2 A15, B8, C15, D12 6.07
4.4 A4, B12, C4, D8 6.32

scatter plot of grades

Here is a scatter plot showing the relation between all other components and the final exam. In addition to the trend line, there are lines showing totals of 620, 560, 510, 460, and 380 dividing into the grades of A, B+, B, C+, C, and "other".

A summary of all components of the grade has been entered in the FAS Gradebook. These numbers represent the content of my records at the time that course grades were determined even if earlier entries in the FAS gradebook were not updated.




Comments on this page should be sent to: bumby@math.rutgers.edu
Last updated: January 12, 2004